SPRING/BREAK 2018

 

I checked out the exhausting and impressive SPRING/BREAK Art Fair last weekend. Here, I've paired up my photos of all the sexy dirty artwork I could find with some Wednesday afternoon musings. I hope you enjoy! xo MacKenzie

What can we learn from porn of the past? Romance, revery, experimentation, and joy abound in Booth 2235, curated by John Wolf and Secret Project: Secret Gay Box. I'm a huge fan of Mike Kuchar (see the uncircumcised Adam in the city). His retro style, bright colors, and irresistible protagonists make for very approachable work and a refreshing perspective on gayness.  

Also featured (first image on the left): MAN ALIVE, 2013, Folded pigment print by Jack Pierson

  U Wanna? , 2018, Oil and acrylic airbrush on canvas,  Jeanette Hayes   Castor Gallery, Room #2201 featuring J fast, J furious, paintings by New York artist,  Jeanette Hayes

U Wanna?, 2018, Oil and acrylic airbrush on canvas, Jeanette Hayes

Castor Gallery, Room #2201 featuring J fast, J furious, paintings by New York artist, Jeanette Hayes

With Manga becoming more mainstream, here, I'm excited to learn more about its history and key figures. What is it about seeing currently popular sneakers in a painting like this so delightful? The realism of the sneakers against the cartoon character on a motorcycle? For me that's my point of reference. Memories of trying on a pair and the salesperson, answering a question I didn't ask, insisting that the bubbles on the bottoms of those Nikes only pop ... rarely. 

 
 

Jessica Lichtenstein, "OOH LA LA," 2012

What is it about taking a collection of kitsch objects and displaying them neatly in a sleek plastic box that makes them so extra desirable? What machinations are being employed on me? Why am I totally ok with it? It feels like a recreation of the consumer experience. For just $24,000 I can live with a store display, employing modes of desire (two-fold) on my 24/7, 365.

The next collection of images, above, is from the Untitled Space booths where sexy imagery abound! The dense display in the re-created hotel room reminded me of the shoot we produced with cammer and performance artist, Lindsay Dye. Similar to (HOTEL) XX curated by Indira Cesarine for The Untitled Space, Dye carefully curated a rotating exhibit of sexy artwork by (I believe) all female artists and seeing it in her bedroom-cam-studio gave it an extra charge, an energy I felt in Booth 2348 + 2350. 

 
 
 
 "Sultry Fuzzer Babe," 2017 by Eliot Greenwald and Michael Ford

"Sultry Fuzzer Babe," 2017 by Eliot Greenwald and Michael Ford

"Fuzz," featuring works by Ryan Michael Ford and Eliot Greenwald, curated by Brigitte Mulholland was a cohesive delight. Greenwalds's sculptures and Ford's paintings sang with psychedelic-Disney color and imagery with an underlying mood of contemporary sexual expression and smirking selfie-era self-awareness. I was enamored with "Sultry Fuzzer Babe," and I'm sad I couldn't bring her home.  

 Christopher Buening, Zemijuju, 2018, Mixed media ceramic/plaster sculpture

Christopher Buening, Zemijuju, 2018, Mixed media ceramic/plaster sculpture

Do I find this piece to be confident because of the vague erection or because of the deliberate strangeness of it? Maybe both! Upon closer inspection, I see a duality of sex-organs: vagina and penis. I see combinations of hand-crafted plaster and a found-object, feather necklace-thing that reminds me of these roach clips with adornments dangling off. It makes me think of an altar, on this custom-made shelf. I am it and I want to sit on it. It looks like it has existed for a long time as a rock from the earth or as a piece of vintage decoration. 

 
 
 
 Just like last year, the SPRING/BREAK exhibits compete with the complex, rich, and ever-changing scenes out the window. Looking down on the city is incredible. I find that the artworks inside are only as effective as they are able to keep my eyes off the scene outside.

Just like last year, the SPRING/BREAK exhibits compete with the complex, rich, and ever-changing scenes out the window. Looking down on the city is incredible. I find that the artworks inside are only as effective as they are able to keep my eyes off the scene outside.

 
MacKenzie Peck